Come Out for Our First Gay Jewish Film Series – Every Sunday in October at 4 pm

Presented in Partnership with Stonewall National Museum & Archives and Congregation Etz Chaim
with generous support from the Jewish Federation of Broward County.

Enjoy four unforgettable movies from Heymann Brothers Films, an impendent Israeli company dedicated to the release of documentaries on the social aspect of the Israeli/Jewish culture. Purchase the entire series for $36, or individual films for $10 each.
All films take place at Congregation Etz Chaim, Pride Center – Rear Building, 2038 N Dixie Hwy, Wilton Manors.

Support the Series – See all Four Films for $36

Refreshments provided courtesy of Barefoot Wine & Bubbly.
Snacks provided.

Purchase tickets to individual films for $10 each below.

Life In Stills

Sunday, October 7, 2018 at 4 pm

At the age of 96, Miriam Weissenstein never imagined that she would be facing a new chapter in her life. But when “The Photo House” – her late husband Rudi’s life’s work – was destined for demolition, even this opinionated and uncompromising woman knew she needed help.

Under the cloud of a family tragedy, a special relationship is forged between Miriam and her grandson, Ben, as they join forces to save the shop and its nearly one million negatives that document Israel’s defining moments.

Despite the generation gap and many conflicts, Ben and Miriam embark on a heart-wrenching journey, comprising many humorous and touching moments – a journey that requires a lot of love, courage, and compassion.

Who's Gonna Love Me Now?

Sunday, October 14, 2018 at 4 pm

Winner of the panorama award for documentary film at Berlinale festival and 11 more international awards

Blood is thicker than water, but blood is also the problem that flows through the veins of Barak and Tomar Heymann’s sincere, moving documentary that won the Panorama Audience Award in Berlin. Now around 40, Saar Moaz is a genial, charming, gay Israeli who has for years been a central member of the London Gay Men’s Chorus. He is also HIV-positive and experiencing all the challenges not only of his illness but also of his long-term expat status. He has built himself a good and happy life, but it is far away from the family, traditions and home whose tidal pull he has never stopped feeling.

At 21, he was expelled from the kibbutz that is still home to four generations of Moazes, including his six younger siblings, devoutly religious mother and militaristic, patriotic father. For the latter especially, Saar’s sexuality has been difficult to accept; for all the others his disease is the hardest thing to come to terms with. Whether it’s his sister’s fear that he could inadvertently infect one of the children; his mother’s grief at their separation and the likely shortening of his life span; or Saar’s own deeply ingrained shame at the “karma” of having contracted the disease (which happened during a drug-and-sex bender following a failed relationship), his HIV-positive status is a burden three times over: physically, spiritually and psychologically. The surprise of the Heymanns’ documentary is that although the issues it tackles are troublesome and heartsore, the film is anything but morose, as though it emanates from the engaging Saar himself, like a song.

I Shot My Love

Sunday, October 21, 2018 at 4 pm

This 48-hour love affair, originating in Berghain Panorama Bar, develops into a significant relationship between Tomer and Andreas Merk, a German dancer. When Andreas decides to move to Tel-Aviv, he not only has to cope with a new partner, but to manage the complex realities of life in Israel and his personal connection to it as a German citizen.

Tomer’s mother, descendent of German immigrants was born and lived all her life in a small Israeli village, where she raised five sons. One by one, she watches her children leave the country she and her family helped to build, and now cannot help but try to influence the life of Tomer, the one son who remains.

I SHOT MY LOVE tells a personal but universal love story and follows the triangular relationship between Tomer, his German boyfriend, and his intensely Israeli mother.

The Queen Has No Crown

Sunday, October 28, 2018 at 4 pm

The Queen Has No Crown is Tomer Heymann’s poignant meditation on family, loss, and the mental maps of homelessness. The film navigates the intimate lives of 5 brothers and their mother, as they experience the pains of exile and the joys of family bonding. Three of the Heymann sons take their families and leave Israel, one after the other, for “better” lives in America. They fulfill their dreams, but shatter those of their mother. A divorcee, she is left alone in Israel with her two bachelor sons — one straight, and the other, Tomer, gay.

Exploring the politics of belonging, displacement, and sexuality, the film examines the hard decisions one family has to make, and the intractable bonds that unite them in the face of difficult life choices. Throughout, Tomer frames this quest in terms of its greater social and political significance: the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, tensions between Israel’s Arabs and Jews, its secular and ultra-orthodox citizens, and the struggle for gay/human rights.

Tomer, combining 8 and 16mm footage with his own work of a decade, shows how the strength of the Heymann Family depends on forces greater than the nuclear family itself. The result, The Queen Has No Crown, is a powerful and intimate portrait of one man, his family, and the world surrounding them.